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A Russian Collector in London

Description

Monday 4th December

 

MEMBERS ONLY
FULLY BOOKED

 

6:30 pm to 7:30 pm

in Knightsbridge

Price Member (please login) Free

DATE & TIME

 

Monday 4th December 2017

 

6:30 pm to 7:30 pm

location

 

in Knightsbridge, London

RUSSIAN ART

 

Russian paintings have had a turbulent history, especially those created during the revolutionary years 1917 – 1924. After the revolution, many were dispersed to collectors all over the world, some still thought to be lost or stolen. Avant-garde artists themselves escaped from the socio-political unrest and unscrupulous repressions of the period, seeking refuge in the West. During the last 30 years, these exceptionally rare collections of paintings and the unheard stories of oppressed artists have began to re-emerge, with some interesting revelations. We begin to see just how much Russian artists were indebted to European artistic tradition. In spite of this European influence, Russian artists kept a distinctly nationalistic voice, through their borrowing from Russian folklore and archaic religious images, especially icons. This is what imbues Russian art with such mystery: its borrowed folk language is so removed from a European visual syntax, but is still perceived through a Western art historical narrative. Yet, seen through a prism of Russian art history, the images begin to tell a different story.